Intern Series: Professional Advice Takeaways

As summer winds down and school begins again, our dedicated group of interns reflects on their experiences in the industry for the past several weeks. We at The AD Club have no doubts that this remarkable bunch has a very bright future ahead. Here’s what they’ve learned…

 

One piece of professional advice that I will carry with me is to create my personal brand and follow through with it. Put myself out there and don’t be afraid of trying something new or pushing the boundaries a bit, because that is what will make you stand out. – Jenny Gandhi, Senior at University of Maryland College Park, Internship with Verizon

 

The biggest piece of professional advice that I will carry with me from the AD Club is my ability to create my own niche. Even though no particular seminar focused on this completely, every lesson I learned involved making myself unique in the advertising world. I understand the importance of specializing myself in my own brand and am motivated to determine and develop this brand through my career. – Brian Finkelstein, Junior at University of Massachusetts Amherst, Internship with Havas Worldwide Strat Farm

 

At the beginning of the summer, my mentor told me to take advantage and make the best of every opportunity that comes my way this summer. As an AD Club intern, I had the chance to explore various options within the industry. Taking his advice, I tried to meet as many people as possible — not only at networking events, but also within my internship at Deutsch. I decided to put myself out there and schedule meetings with individuals in various departments throughout the summer — and even had a one-on-one with the CEO! This has not only allowed me to learn more about the industry in general, but also expand my network–which I will definitely carry with me as I approach post-grad life. – Julia Cohen, Senior at Brandeis University, Internship with Deutsch

 

One piece of professional advice that I will take away with me was given from EVP, Director of National Broadcast at Initiative, Kris Magel. One piece of advice he gave that resonated with me was: to be great at something. Magel identified the beginning years of any career are the times to explore different divisions and areas of focus within the industry. However, he strongly advised that one important goal, as a learning professional, should be to become an expert at one thing or one focus of your career. I greatly appreciated this idea because as he suggested, it is easy for people to remember and want to work with a person who is very well-versed in one specific field. He did not undermine the idea of being a well-rounded professional who is skillful in many ways, but did emphasize the importance of arriving at one specific focus that can be most concentrated on when growing as an employee. So as I graduate from this internship program, I will carry away this idea of becoming great at one specific thing so that I can execute my skills and efforts towards becoming a reliable and respected expert. – Abby Vigdor, Senior at Loyola University, Internship with Verizon

 

“One piece of professional advice that I will carry with me will be the importance of self-branding.  In order to enter a desired industry, it is necessary to communicate your personal story in order to demonstrate to others how you personally can benefit that industry.  This can be done by telling your story and establishing a brand for yourself through social media such as LinkedIn or Twitter, or through one-on-one conversations with members in the industry.” – Jack Piontkowski, Senior at Villanova University, Internship with Microsoft

i’mPART: Moving the Ad Industry Forward

imPART is one of the single most important initiatives at The AD Club, designed to raise awareness of the benefits of diversity in business and rally professionals around a shared movement. The acronym represents the pillars of the initiative — to Promote, Attract, Retain and Train multicultural talent. Check out these videos below to meet the advocates and learn more! 
 

 
 

 

ADTHINK Speaker Ulla Engeström on Building a New Network

Ulla Engeström, CEO of ThingLink, discusses how she has learned to categorize the four types of introductions in The Wall Street Journal article below. We are thrilled to welcome Ulla as a speaker for our upcoming event in the ADTHINK series. Stay tuned for further details so you can witness Ulla in action!

Ulla Engeström: Four Ways of Building a New Network

Juliana Harkki

I recently moved from Helsinki to Brooklyn for the purpose of setting up our sales and marketing operations in New York. Though I had previously lived in California for two years, my network of friends and colleagues in the US was small.

Running a tech company outside of Europe was something I had no experience with. In anticipation of the cross-Atlantic move, I had signed up eight U.S.-based angel investors and seven advisers with experience on consumer web, media, advertising, and funding. They, I planned, would now become my support network in New York.

As I eventually managed to get my WiFi operational, and the networking started, I learned to categorize the four types of introductions: 1) free and fun 2) free and focused 3) paid, but unwanted and 4) paid and focused.

Free and Fun

Meeting people without an agenda gives room for serendipity; you never know who you’ll meet next and how that may change your life. As a European female tech entrepreneur in the US, you have chances to be interesting and curious, or just ignored (depending who you already know, of course, and how well you communicate). When you run a company and have two small kids, you should choose your parties well. Your best chances for inspiring and just plainly delightful networking will be at small dinners organized by good friends or fellow entrepreneurs.

Free and focused

When I moved to New York, I often stayed with one of my two closest friends who are well-networked women in science and technology. Both of them have been amazingly helpful professionally and personally and have provided an intellectual peer network that can at any time be activated for a cause. All in all, in the first six months, these existing friendships turned out to be more valuable to my networking than most of my advisors together. I look for any opportunity to return a favor.

Paid, but unwanted

One of the biggest challenges for a startup entrepreneur is to stay focused. When you raise a seed round, a lot of people want to become your advisor, and typically these people like to recommend their friends as your advisors too. Good advisors can surely help you network, but what you don’t want is people, who for the excitement or responsibility of being part of a startup, fill your inbox with random introductions. As everything in business (and life) is about timing, business introductions from advisors who have not invested money in your company, rarely lead to anything useful. Even worse are people who make useless introductions and afterwards come and claim compensation for work that has added zero value to your business.

Paid and Focused

When you move to a new country it takes some time to figure out the things you really need help with and how to find the best people to help you.

So far the best value for money in terms of networking and growing a business has been at events like SXSW. Paying $5,000 for a booth and plane tickets and coming back with 10 customer leads worth of $100,000 monthly recurring revenue is healthier than giving out 0.25 points of equity for closing a $100,000 investment.

In the category of free and potentially fun I have not yet tried is joining networks of other female entrepreneurs. Now that 500 Startups just launched 500 Women, I will try that next.

Ms. Engeström is the CEO of ThingLink, an interactive image platform.

For link to WSJ article, click here

Increasing Diversity in Business: What Can You Do?

Gina Grillo, President & CEO, The AD Club of New York

Gina Grillo, President & CEO, The AD Club of New York

eBay and Apple are the latest to join the long list of public companies to share their diversity data widely with the masses. We are constantly discussing – too often in abstracts – the need to foster diversity of thought in advertising and marketing. But what can you, as business-savvy industry professionals and thought leaders in the space, actually do to improve this issue of  the lack of diversity in our industry? How can you work to represent a greater range of diverse backgrounds within in your business?

It all starts with retention. Here are 3 tips for creating an inclusive environment:

1. Create a Valuable Experience. Build an environment that not only provides an abundance of training and information to new employees, but also take the extra steps to make them feel comfortable and included. 

 2. Provide Diversity Training. Helping your executives, managers and employees understand the importance of fostering diversity of thought is imperative to building successful professional communities.

 3. Conduct Exit Interviews. In order to truly recognize what steps can be taken to improve retention of culturally diverse employees, seek candid answers from those walking out the door. 

The Power of H2H Marketing

By Andrea Catsicas

Communication is everything.

Andrea Catsicas

Andrea Catsicas

Whether it be in business or in our personal lives, we, as humans, thrive, even crave, the intimate contact that accompanies communication. But when it comes down to business, the days of communication only via business to business (B2B) or business to consumer (B2C) is officially a thing of the past. With social media and the infinite resources of reaching out online, it is now human to human (H2H) marketing that is in demand.

With digital, mobile and social media all blending together to make up the perfect H2H marketing concoction, we remain at an advantage that our predecessors lacked. Technology is on our side, as we build more personalized relationships with clients. Still, the most vital cautionary steps would be to make sure that as we communicate and remain so available and so reachable through social media, email, texting, etc., that we do not lose sight of the personal, albeit human touch, that coincides with H2H marketing. In other words, we cannot get so caught up in being so connected, that we actually lose that H2H connection.

There is great irony is using caution to not become so connected digitally, that we lose the human connection from which every business benefits. We are able to take advantage of these uber-avaiable digital outlets, but must always remember that until we meet face to face, the human factor is not at 100%. The foundation and the groundwork for H2H marketing can be done via technological outlets, but in the end, there will always be that certain reassurance that many business owners expect to solidify a deal or working relationship.

In order to keep a proper balance of H2H marketing and assume the role as a less human robotic company, be sure to focus on the things that benefit both your clients and yourself. Are you communicating digitally but still remaining personal enough to build a solid foundation with a new client? Do you offer communication via a multitude of digital outlets, yet are still always available for face-to-face meetings? Is your staff properly trained to work the balance between both of these things?

These are things to consider as you continue to contribute to building a solid H2H marketing plan for your clients.

At the end of the day, H2H marketing should focus on the idea that using social media, email and other technologies is an advantage and an additional enhancement of the way successful businesses are handled. While not fully relying on H2H marketing, it should continue to grow as a vital part of your business plan. Before you know it, you will build a stronger client base, as well as more intimate and personal relationships by using these modern day communication methods. But never forget the power of a handshake and a smile.

Andrea Catsicas is CEO and President of Peak Interest a Full Marketing and Media Solution where she delivers results that draw on her experience from Coca-Cola North America,  Crispin Porter + Bogusky and Zimmerman Advertising (Omnicom).  Follow her on Twitter at @AndreaCatsicas. 

The Creative Group’s 2014 Salary Guide

SketchWhether you’re looking for the latest creative and marketing salary data, want to know a starting graphic designer salary or simply feel like crunching numbers on our salary calculator, The Creative Group’s buzzworthy Salary Center is your definitive salary hot spot. Check it out here: Salary Center.

TCG’s annual salary guide for creative and marketing professionals is more than just your source for creative, advertising, marketing and PR salaries – it’s brimming with hot hiring trends and bold job descriptions. Oh, and did we mention that the theme is coffee? Because there’s more where that came from.

Think of TCG as your “salary barista,” serving up the latest compensation data and hiring information to help you make the best hiring and employment decisions. If you’re looking to hire, you’ll find tips for attracting the “crema” of the creative crop. And if you’re seeking new employment opportunities, discover what top companies look for in creative candidates – like rich industry experience and social media expertise.

 

The Vertical Series: CPG with Bonin Bough, Mondelez

The AD Club and our friends at Yahoo proudly welcomed industry innovator Bonin Bough, VP of Media & Consumer Engagement of Mondelez, at our second Vertical Series breakfast on July 30th.

Bonin took us on a journey into the world of “Hackonomy” – his platform that highlights an increasingly important need to “break things” in order to create value. So what is a Hackonomy and how can we apply this principle to media?

The future is digital. Today, 24% of media is consumed on mobile, yet only 1% of media is purchased there. With more Android devices activating each day than there are babies born, it’s clear the growth of smartphones are changing our society. Even with all the lip service paid to innovation, change is merely incremental. The real question, Bonin argued, is: how can organizations train their talent to compete in a completely digital future? It’s about encouraging them to rethink mobility, break things, engage in real-time, invest, and focus on mobile culture.

We are entering a world of “Hackonomy.” A hacker is an expert at programmatically solving problems; they don’t hit a wall and stop trying; they break right through it. That mentality is truly transformative and adds greater value to business. Hugh Herr, who lost both legs in a rock climbing accident, engineered bionics that have allowed him to surpass his previous climbing skill. By tearing things down and building them back up again, we’re starting to hack some very basic things, which can lead to hacking bigger things in not only our industry, but also the world. The best way to predict the future is to hack it! 

How can media professionals hack the industry? Through the allocation of resources, agencies should prioritize the development of high-velocity content that reaches consumers in real-time. All brands create content, hoping someone sees it, but according to Bonin, that’s lazy. CPG brands need to start behaving like startups and embrace the concept of being an “intrapreneur” in order to succeed in today’s fragmented media marketplace.

Presenter: Bonin Bough, VP Media & Consumer Engagement, Mondelez

Q&A Moderator Andrew Snyder, Yahoo

AdThink V: Featuring the Best & Brightest in Ad/Tech

adthink

On July 22nd, The AD Club and REDBOOKS proudly gathered the industry’s top marketers, brand managers, agency figures, innovators, and entrepreneurs at the 5th event in the ongoing AdThink series. A special thank you to our event sponsor, Davis Gilbert, and host, Microsoft who showcased their new Times Square office, attendees were invited to witness the “shark tank”-style action as an all-star panel of industry experts critiqued and evaluated four handpicked, cutting-edge ad/tech start-ups. Speaking to a packed house, each start-up had 5 minutes to make their case to the panelists. Here’s what they had to say:

  • Jebbit’s Tom Coburn (@tomcoburn1) talked about powering post-click engagement. Jebbit is not interested in media or driving content; they’re all about the moment a consumer lands on that content and how they engage with it. By incentivizing users to answer simple questions about branded products, Jebbit gathers data about the interaction, which in turn influences the way businesses market their product. Jebbit-generated data drives higher conversion rates, increased engagement, and more time spent viewing content with fewer ad dollars spent.
  • Grapevine Logic’s Brendan Latrell (@brendanlattrell) illustrated their advocate-based approach to consumer engagement. The new expert advocate of today is a regular consumer whose voice carries a great deal of weight via social media and video channels. Grapevine has built that idea into an advertising platform with industry-leading click through and conversion metrics. This platform pinpoints appropriate social advocates and curates product promotion while maintaining the authenticity of the specific advocate.
  • Placed’s David Shim (@davidshim) discussed how his platform connects the digital space with the physical world, and then utilizes that information to measure true ad-exposure. Their model takes data and translates it into locational information about the consumer. The end result allows Placed to measure the impact ads have on driving in-store traffic.
  • Splashscore’s Lyle Stevens (@thelylestevens) explained the premise that friends have the largest impact on consumer purchasing behavior. Splashscore will identify those who are the most influential in any given social circle and activate them as advocates to drive branded content. The results show that this type of influential marketing drastically outperforms ads.

After witnessing some of the brightest in ad/tech discuss their proposed solutions, it’s clear that increasing consumer engagement is perhaps the greatest challenge posed to the industry today. How can these start-ups confront this issue while also maintaining distinction in such a saturated market? Already looking forward to AdThink VI on September 16, where we will surely be wowed once again by the innovative minds leading the charge!

Panelists:

Alan Cohen (@tvac8) – Co-Founder, Giant Spoon

Michael Duda (@MikeDuda) – CEO, Johannes Leonardo + Founder, Consigliere Brand Capital

Sam Olstein (@slammin) – Director of Global Innovation, GE

Moderator:

Joseph Jaffe (@JaffeJuice) – Founder/CEO, Evol8tion

Digital Advertising Alliance takes new steps to implement Self-Regulatory Principles in the Mobile Environment

The Digital Advertising Alliance (“DAA”) recently unveiled plans for two new mobile applications that will allow consumers to “opt out” of behavioral advertising on mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets. One program will govern opting out within mobile applications, and the other will govern mobile web browsers. The development comes just over a year after the DAA released its Application of Self-Regulatory Principles to the Mobile Environment (the “Mobile Principles”), which provide guidance on how the DAA’s previously issued Self-Regulatory Principles for Online Behavioral Advertising (the “OBA Principles”) apply to mobile applications and web browsers.

The OBA Principles recommend providing online consumers with a DAA-endorsed web tool which allows them to opt out of behavioral data collection by modifying their “cookie settings.” By opting out, consumers no longer see advertising targeted to their interests (as determined by their tracked online activity), but rather see generic advertising. The new applications, which will be available for free consumer download later in 2014, provide an analog to the existing online tool in the mobile environment in accordance with the principles set forth in the Mobile Guidelines. While we have yet to see how functional, effective, user-friendly (and popular) such applications will be, they demonstrate a major step towards implementing more concrete methods of self-regulation in the mobile and digital arena.

 

By Richard EisertTechnology, Digital Media & Privacy Partner and Paavana KumarAdvertising, Marketing & Promotions Associate at Davis & Gilbert LLP

Eisert, Richard S     Kumar, Paavana 300

Davis & Gilbert was proud to sponsor the AdThink program, “The Best & Brightest in Ad/Tech” presented by The Advertising Club of New York and Advertising Redbooks held in New York City on July 22, 2014.

The Sherpa Path

Enjoy The Path To Your Summit Of Success

The Sherpa Path

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

AD Club Insider

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

BlueTales » JetBlue

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

Rubicon Project

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

MEC Global BlogMEC Global Blog

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

Digital Lab Blog

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

Adrants

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

AdPulp

Daily Juice from the Ad Biz

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

Brian Solis

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

Just another WordPress.com site

Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

Seth Godin's Blog on marketing, tribes and respect

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

Social Media Examiner

The Insider is our new blog providing access to the leading voices in advertising, marketing and media. Read original content on industry trends and issues shaping the future of our business.

Copyblogger

Online marketing that works

chrisbrogan.com

Building the Digital Channel - Beyond Social Media

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,946 other followers